If Ifs And Buts Were Candy and Nuts

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If Ifs And Buts Were Candy and Nuts

If Ifs And Buts Were Candy and Nuts

This idiom first appeared in a nursery rhyme in the 17th century. The original verse, “If wishes were horses,” was often added to Christmas greetings and was popularized as a Christmas song. The popularized phrase meant, “we’d all have a Merry Christmas.” Today, the idiom can be heard in pop culture and on TV shows.

Idiom Meaning

“If ifs and buts were candy and nuts,” an idiomatic expression and contraction of “If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we’d all have a Merry Christmas,” is a contraction of “If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we’d all have a Merry Christmas.” If you appreciated hearing the words “if” and “but” in someone’s reasoning, you would have had enough to live a better life, according to the statement.

The term appears throughout popular culture, most notably in television series. For example, you may have heard Sheldon Cooper from “The Big Bang Theory” use it with Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson when discussing his exclusion of Pluto from the known planets of the Solar System.

If Onlys and Buts Were Candy and Nuts

The phrase “If only and buts were candy and nuts” has become a popular idiom in modern society, underscoring the futility of wishing. Its origins are attributed to Sir Thomas More, who wrote the 16th-century poem If Wishes Were Horses.

The phrase was coined by Don Meredith in response to a question by a sports commentator, “What would happen if Los Angeles won?” He replied: “If only and buts were candy and nuts, we’d all have a merry Christmas!” The expression quickly became popular in the Anglosphere and even appeared on some television shows.

If Onlys and Buts Were Candies and Nuts

The idiomatic saying “If only and buts were candy and nuts” comes from a nursery rhyme. Don Meredith created the phrase, a sports commentator when he responded to a question from a sports commentator about Los Angeles’s recent loss to Boston in the NBA Finals. Meredith’s response was a clever parody of a nursery rhyme and soon became a popular expression in the Anglosphere. It also made an appearance in a popular television series, “The Office.”

Despite being a common saying, If Onlys and Buts Were Candy and Nuts is often used to highlight the fact that wishes rarely come true, so wishing is pointless. It’s said to have first appeared in a nursery rhyme in the 17th century. In addition, it was cited as the origin of “If Wishes Were Horses” and “Penny for Your Thoughts.”

If Wishes and Buts Were Candies and NutsIf Ifs And Buts Were Candy and Nuts

The idiom If wishes and buts were candy and nuts has become an enduring part of our culture. It emphasizes the futility of wishful thinking and the impossibility of fulfilling one’s dreams. The phrase was first used in a nursery rhyme. In the 17th century, a version of the rhyme became popular, which also included the phrase “if wishes were horses.”

Originally a nursery rhyme, the phrase is a cultural reference to the longing for unattainable or unlikely things. It is often used in a partial comment, and the context sometimes obscures its meaning. For example, many people hear the phrase and assume it refers to body parts, but it’s not.

Idiom Origin

The phrase “ifs and buts were candy and nuts” initially featured in the classic nursery rhyme “if wishes were horses,” which was popular with parents and their children in the 17th century. It would often include the phrase “We’d all have a Merry Christmas” at the end for extra impact.

Typically, the phrase’s meaning would apply to substituting excuses with something we want. At the time, sweets and nuts were considered luxuries and a symbol of a comfortable life. However, the phrase didn’t fully catch on in modern parlance until quarterback Don Meredith said it during a game broadcast. The former quarterback coined the phrase in modern media in 1970 when it began to catch on with the American public, particularly those who watched Monday Night Football.

Meredith first used the phrase while commentating on a Los Angeles Raiders game. During the game, his co-commentator said, “If Los Angeles wins…” Meredith replied, “If ifs and buts were candy and nuts…”