Mouth Positions For Letter & Vowel Sounds

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Mouth Positions For Letter Sounds

Mouth Positions For Letter & Vowel Sounds

The position of the mouth and other parts of the speech production system, such as the lips, teeth, tongue, and vocal cords, can affect the sounds produced when speaking and can also vary depending on the language being spoken. Here are a few examples of how the mouth can be positioned to produce different letter sounds:

  • The letters “b,” “m,” and “p” are produced using the lips. To make these sounds, the lips are brought together and the air is released through the small opening between the lips.
  • The letters “d,” “t,” and “n” are produced using the tongue and teeth. To make these sounds, the tongue is pressed against the back of the teeth and the air is released through the small opening between the tongue and teeth.
  • The letters “f,” “v,” and “th” (as in “this”) are produced using the top teeth and lower lip. To make these sounds, the top teeth are pressed against the lower lip and the air is released through the small opening between the teeth and lip.
  • The letter “h” is produced using the vocal cords. To make this sound, the vocal cords vibrate as air passes through them.
  • The letter “s” is produced using the tip of the tongue and the back of the top front teeth. To make this sound, the tip of the tongue is pressed against the back of the top front teeth and the air is released through the small opening between the tongue and teeth.
  • The letters “g,” “j,” “k,” “q,” and “x” are produced using the back of the tongue and the soft palate (the soft tissue at the back of the mouth). To make these sounds, the back of the tongue is raised and pressed against the soft palate, and the air is released through the small opening between the tongue and palate.
  • The letter “l” is produced using the tip of the tongue and the roof of the mouth. To make this sound, the tip of the tongue is pressed against the roof of the mouth and the air is released through the small opening between the tongue and the roof of the mouth.
  • The letter “r” is produced using the tip of the tongue and the back of the front teeth. To make this sound, the tip of the tongue is curled and pressed against the back of the front teeth, and the air is released through the small opening between the tongue and teeth.
  • The letter “z” is produced using the tip of the tongue and the back of the upper molars. To make this sound, the tip of the tongue is pressed against the back of the upper molars and the air is released through the small opening between the tongue and molars.
  • The letter “y” is produced using the front part of the tongue and the roof of the mouth. To make this sound, the front part of the tongue is raised and pressed against the roof of the mouth and the air is released through the small opening between the tongue and the roof of the mouth.

I hope this helps to give you a better understanding of how the mouth can be positioned to produce different letter sounds. It is worth noting that the specific manner of production can vary slightly depending on the language being spoken and the individual sounds of the letters.

Cardinal Vowel Chart Common

Mouth Positions For Vowel Sounds

The position of the mouth and other parts of the speech production system, such as the lips, teeth, tongue, and vocal cords, can affect the sounds produced when speaking and can also vary depending on the language being spoken. Here are a few examples of how the mouth can be positioned to produce different vowel sounds:

  • The vowel sound “a” is produced using the mouth, throat, and vocal cords. To make this sound, the mouth is opened and the vocal cords vibrate as air passes through them and the throat.
  • The vowel sound “e” is produced using the mouth, throat, and vocal cords. To make this sound, the mouth is opened slightly and the vocal cords vibrate as air passes through them and the throat.
  • The vowel sound “i” is produced using the mouth, throat, and vocal cords. To make this sound, the mouth is opened slightly and the vocal cords vibrate as air passes through them and the throat.
  • The vowel sound “o” is produced using the lips and the back of the mouth. To make this sound, the lips are rounded and the back of the mouth is opened slightly, allowing the air to be released through the small opening between the lips and the back of the mouth.
  • The vowel sound “u” is produced using the mouth, throat, and vocal cords. To make this sound, the mouth is opened slightly and the vocal cords vibrate as air passes through them and the throat.